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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dutch policy on the management of drug-related problems found in the catalog.

Dutch policy on the management of drug-related problems

Dutch policy on the management of drug-related problems

an Anglo-Dutch debate.

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Taken from British journal of addictions, vol.84, 1989, pp. 989-997.

SeriesBritish journal of addiction -- v.84
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19693895M

Pharmacists have become involved in medication management in a number of outpatient clinics, such as anticoagulation management, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV, and tuberculosis clinics. The pharmacist’s role as a drug expert involves medication reconciliation, management of drug-related problems, and patient education. The drug policy of the Netherlands is marked by its distinguishing between so called soft and hard drugs. An often used argument is that alcohol, which is claimed by some scientists as a hard drug, is legal and a soft drug can't be more dangerous to society if it's controlled. This may refer to the Prohibition in the s, when the U.S. government decided to ban all alcohol.

The Netherlands tolerates the sale of soft drugs in ‘coffee shops’. A coffee shop is an establishment where cannabis may be sold subject to certain strict conditions, but no alcoholic drinks may be sold or consumed. The Dutch government does not prosecute members of the public for possession or use of small quantities of soft drugs. However, in the Netherlands as elsewhere, drugs cause. Drug-related problems (DRPs) lead to substantial morbidity and mortality, as well as increased health care expenditure, which in turn affect both patients and society. Norwegian and international studies show that nursing homes (4, 5), hospitals (6, 7) and general practices (8, 9) have a high prevalence of such problems, and Cited by:

Dutch policy on the use of cannabis is based on the assumption that people are more likely to make the set priorities in the detection and prosecution of offenders who have committed drug-related crimes. Large-scale, cross-border trafficking in hard drugs has the highest priority everywhere, the lowest continuity and Size: 1MB. REPRESSIVE approach to drug policy Goal: to be a drug-free society 's: Drug policy approach liberal--similar to the Dutch policy. 's: Switch towards more restrictive policy due to increase in drug use leading to social problem. 's: Drug policy has not changed much ever Size: 2MB.


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Dutch policy on the management of drug-related problems Download PDF EPUB FB2

Dutch Policy on the Management of Drug‐related Problems Based on a paper presented at a meeting entitled ‘Responding to Drug Problems: an Anglo‐Dutch debate’, held at the Royal Society of Medicine, London, September 15th The meeting was organized jointly by the Royal Society of Medicine and the Society for the Study of by: Dutch policy on the management of drug-related problems.

Engelsman EL. Comment in Br J Addict. Sep;84(9) It is argued that the drug abuse problem should not be primarily seen as a problem of police and justice.

It is essentially a manner of by: Engelsman, E. Dutch policy on the management of drug-related problems. Br J Addiction. ; Kuiper, H. Prevalentie van Cannabisgebruik in Nederland [Prevalence of Cannabis Use in the Netherlands].

Utrecht: Netherlands Institute of Alcohol and Drugs,   Dutch policy relies heavily on prevention, as well as treatment of drug problems. Although available statistics suggest that these policies are relatively successful in the Netherlands, careful consideration must be given to situational variables in any attempts to adopt them by: Contemporary Dutch drug policy is a product of many long-term political, demographic and social changes that have taken place in the Netherlands since the nation's first drug law was enacted in drug-related social problems in the Netherlands.

Drug Law-Enforcement Policy The revised Opium Act of is a compromise between outright prohibition and attempted normalization and social integration of drug use. Compared with previous Dutch drug laws, the penal law revision embodied the following changes: reduction of all penalties.

Education and government information have traditionally kept drug-related health problems in the Netherlands low, compared with the rest of Europe.

One in Author: Shirley Haasnoot. However, the Dutch approach is as vulnerable to politics as any policy. In a climate ripe for populism, interparty squabbles can lead to regressive drug policy approaches.

In recent years, ambitious lawmakers or candidates have used drug policy as a wedge issue. Another dimension could have been added with a comparative reference to the Dutch model of integration management ‘normalization’, which, interestingly for the definitions used throughout this book, means neither acceptance nor criminalization, but rather a discouragement akin to that used in alcohol and tobacco control (Engelsmann Author: Neil Olley.

Introduction. For most diseases, drug therapy enhances health-related quality of life.1 However, inappropriate use of drugs may be harmful and could evoke side effects.2 Drug therapy is growing more complex, thus making appropriate patient management increasingly challenging.3 A drug-related problem (DRP), defined as a drug therapy problem, is any undesirable event experienced by a Cited by: The liberal drug policy of the authorities in the Netherlands especially led to problems in "border hot spots" that attracted "drug tourism" as well as trafficking and related law enforcement problems in towns like Enschede in the East and Terneuzen, Venlo, Maastricht and Heerlen in the South.

Criminal investigations into more serious forms of organized crime, Between andandandand and changes were made in recording.

4 Eddy Engelsman, ‘Dutch Policy on the management of drug-related problems’, British Journal of Addiction 84 () –; DOI /j–tbx. 5 Anja Krabben, Toine Pieters and Stephen Snelders, Chemie van : Gemma Blok. PCNE Classification scheme for Drug-Related Problems V -Page 2 The Detailed Classification-1 The Problems Each problem should be coded separately, but there may be more causes or interventions to one problem.

Primary Domain Code V Problem P Side effect suffered (non-allergic) P Side effect suffered (allergic) 1. Adverse reactionsFile Size: 95KB. Drug-related problems in a sample of outpatients with chronic diseases: a cross-sectional study from Jordan Sayer I Al-Azzam,1 Karem H Alzoubi,1 Salah AbuRuz,2 Qais Alefan1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, 2Department of Biopharmaceutics and Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.

Drug therapy problems (DTPs) (or drug related problems, DRPs) represent the categorization and definition of clinical problems related to the use of medications or "drugs" in the field of pharmaceutical care. In the course of clinical practice, DTPs are often identified, prevented, and/or resolved by pharmacists in the course of medication therapy management, as experts on the safety and.

Pragmatic rather than ideological, Dutch drug policy allows the controlled sale of limited quantities of cannabis in such shops.

Although drug policy is a federal matter, municipalities have the power to alter policy at a local level, to prohibit the coffee. Understanding the costs of drug-related actions is an important aspect of drug policy. In the Netherlands, no budget is associated with the drug policy documents and there is no review of executed expenditures.

Inthe results of a study that aimed to estimate overall drug-related public expenditures in the Netherlands was published. According to the third evaluation of the Hektor project, which was carried out before the introduction of new Dutch coffee shop policy, it is possible to diminish illegal street trade and drug related public nuisance in a Dutch border town by the approach chosen in Hektor (Snippe ).

(b) offering assistance to employees who need it to overcome problems caused by alcohol or drug misuse (c) Aims This policy aims to: 1. raise awareness of the risks of alcohol and other drug related problems 2.

promote the health and wellbeing of employees 3. minimise problems at work arising from the effects of alcohol and other drugs 4 File Size: KB. The Dutch government believes that the illegality of some drugs cause more of an increase in harm (disease, violence) than prosecution for drug offenses.

True .What drives British drug policies?, Griffith Edwards; Dutch policy on the management of drug related problems, Eddy L. Englesman; the reality of drug-dependence - the need for medical intervention, Philip M. Fleming; where does treatment end and rehabilitation begin?HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF HARM REDUCTION A.

The Dutch model Foreign visitors to Amsterdam and other major cities in the Netherlands are often struck with what appears to be a liberal and permissive approach to drugs and sex.

Engelsman (). Dutch policy on the management of drug-related problems. British Journal of Addiction, 84, Cited by: